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An Interview with Aluminum

July 27, 2012
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Today, we will have an interview with the element Aluminum. Below are some questions that tickled our fancy regarding this metal, and we were able to gather a lot of information from it.

Please tell us a little about your history.

Aluminum: I am one of the most widely used metals found around the world. A man named Hans Christian Oersted, on the year 1825, found the found me in a sedimentary rock called Bauxite. Bauxite, or the aluminum ore, can be mined in open pits. When mined, the water inside the rock is removed, leaving white powder called Alumina (aluminum oxide) inside. Even though the US is found to be the one who produces my kind the most, they only ship Bauxite from countries like Canada, China, Australia, India, Brazil, and Russia. 

Any scientific details you want to share with us?

Aluminum: I have an atomic number of 13, which means that I also have 13 protons, and electrons at the same time. Since I have an atomic mass of 27, rounded off from 26.981539 amu, we can say that I have 14 neutrons. After scientists tested on my relatives, they found out that the melting point of Aluminum is 660.37 C˚ while the boiling point is 2467.0 C˚. Even though the aluminum oxide found in Bauxite is white, Aluminum’s solid form is in silver.

Where can you be used in our lives?

Aluminum: At one’s home, you can find me in window frames, utensils, railings, outdoor furniture, cooking materials, or even door knobs. I can also be found in a few parts of airplanes, railroad tracks, and ships. Most of the parts in a car is made out of me, and that I can also be used in construction sites to make buildings sturdier. My resistance to corrosion benefits the way people package boxes, making it safe to drink from a can of soft drinks.

Finding out these information from Aluminum, where else do you think it can be found despite the given information?

http://www.chemicalelements.com/bohr/b0013.gif

http://library.thinkquest.org/05aug/00461/images/bauxite.jpg

http://www.chemicalelements.com/elements/al.html

http://library.thinkquest.org/05aug/00461/bauxite.htm

http://sam.davyson.com/as/physics/aluminium/siteus/uses.html

http://www.buzzle.com/articles/aluminum-uses-of-aluminum.html

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